October 31, 2014



 

Innovative Great Barrier Island Eco Home for Flood Protection

great-barrier-island-eco-home-water-tank

great-barrier-island-eco-home-water-tank

Designed by New Zealand based Crosson Clarke Carnachan Architects, this wooden home on the Great Barrier Island north east of Auckland, New Zealand is built on stilts and elevated for flood protection. The sun is used for passive heating, electricity and solar hot water heating, and with its stilt foundation, the home makes a light impact on the site.

The home is built on a beautiful site surrounded with large Puriri trees, Blackwoods and other natives. A foundation of stilts raise the main living area of the home off the ground by one meter and in case of major flooding, the home would hopefully be above the high water mark and remain safe. The home lifts in order to reflect the rise of a hill off to the west of the home and the living area is completely open with large floor to ceiling windows of low e glass.

During the summer, the windows slide open to take advantage of the natural breezes and temperate climate. The winter sun likewise helps the home stay warm as it shines in through the large windows and a beautifully designed fireplace provides some heat when the temperatures drop. A solar hot water system on the roof provides plenty of hot water for the home and its many guests, and a photovoltaic system provides electricity.

great-barrier-island-eco-home-terrace-design

great-barrier-island-eco-home-terrace-design

great-barrier-island-eco-home-narrow-corridor

great-barrier-island-eco-home-narrow-corridor

great-barrier-island-eco-home-interior

great-barrier-island-eco-home-interior

great-barrier-island-eco-home-fireplace

great-barrier-island-eco-home-fireplace

great-barrier-island-eco-home-design-view

great-barrier-island-eco-home-design-view

source: inhabitat, ccca, treehugger, reflexdeco

Modern Biophilic Sunroom Heats from 19th Century Pittsburgh House

biophilic-sunroom-heats-interior-view

biophilic-sunroom-heats-interior-view

Designed by studio d’ARC, this nifty greenhouse and sun room sits atop a 19th century row house in the South Side Flats of Downtown Pittsburgh. The design has lost no punch as it contrasts with the dark factory brick homes of a century ago. Using passive heating the project also helps warm the lower flats — like the original design, but with new efficient equipment that also pumps fresh air into the building. Tenants are given much-needed space to garden and can hang out on the sun deck while taking in the city views and sun rays.

The Architects like the design to those Russian Matryoshka dolls that nestle into each other, an inner structural frame is skinned by an outer frame of glazing and stainless steel, but perhaps a more apt description may be of toppled dominos facing the sun. The tilted roof is a frame for three large south-facing windows which collect a remarkable amount of usable sunlight. A biophilic garden with hydroponic and soil planting systems offers produce and flowers for the tenets.

Access heat is used to temper fresh air with an Energy Recovery Ventilator or ERV. The ERV exchanges 90% of the heat from the green home’s air to the house’s fresh air supply. The warm filtered air is them pumped into the apartments below. By adding a slight pressurization to the building, air infiltration is virtually eliminated– improving comfort and efficiency. On more temperate days fresh air is brought in through an urban snorkel that penetrates the center of the roof. A solar hot water system is planned as well. Low impact material like Trex decking and other high recycled content materials were used throughout the project.

biophilic-sunroom-heats-night-view

biophilic-sunroom-heats-night-view

biophilic-sunroom-heats-interior-plan

biophilic-sunroom-heats-interior-plan

biophilic-sunroom-heats-draft-design

biophilic-sunroom-heats-draft-design

biophilic-sunroom-heats-exterior-design

biophilic-sunroom-heats-exterior-design

biophilic-sunroom-heats-circulation-system

biophilic-sunroom-heats-circulation-system

source: archdaily, sdapgh

Crossway House : The First Certified Passive House in England

crossway-house-solar-panel

crossway-house-solar-panel

Designed by Architect Richard Hawke, this unique home in the English countryside of Staplehurst, Kent has taken a page from architecture history and mixed it with state of the art design to create a one of a kind house. The home’s arched roof is a timbrel vault, an arch that follows a parabola rather than circle.

crossway-house-work-room-design

crossway-house-work-room-design

The result is that the roof requires no added support and reduces material use. Contrasting with the 14th century roof technology is a host of high tech materials and equipment that helped the Crossway House become the first certified Passive House in England.

crossway-house-night-view

crossway-house-night-view

The house received an A-A rating on its Energy Performance Certificate (EPCs) and it is also on its way to becoming the first certified Passive House in England. New technologies compliment the old to provide the 3000 square foot home with an extremely energy efficient shell.

Triple pane windows to the south help heat the internal thermal mass and a first of its kind vacuum exterior door offers the equivalent of 20 inches of foam insulation.

crossway-house-design-view

crossway-house-design-view

The tight building envelope requires a HRV to provide fresh air, and the home supplements passive heating strategies with a biomass boiler. A combination solar electric and solar hot water array provides the home with ample supplies of renewable energy.

crossway-house-bricks-stair

crossway-house-bricks-stair

The home even incorporates Phase Change Materials (PCM) to effectively store heat in the winter and regulate heat in the summer. The rest of the walls are insulated with cellulose, or shredded newspaper. The home harvests roof water for use indoors as well.

crossway-house-at-winter-season

crossway-house-at-winter-season

source: inhabitat, hawkesarchitecture

Unsual Copper Dome House in Melbourne

copper-dome-house-longitudinal-section

copper-dome-house-longitudinal-section

Designed by McBride Charles Ryan, the residence is not a typical home since its rounded form and ultra modern materials give it a delightful and unusual appeal.

copper-dome-house-livingroom-design

copper-dome-house-livingroom-design

You can tell at first glance that the Dome House is not a typical home. Its like a giant puzzle whose components ranged from the large to the infinitesimally small.

copper-dome-house-dome-design

copper-dome-house-dome-design

Located in the suburbs of Melbourne, the design concept of Dome House was to take a copper sphere, bury it in the ground and divvy it up into many varied slices.

Then some fragments were removed while others remained so that the house could open up in the middle creating a unique and intimate relationship with the garden.

copper-dome-house-design-view

copper-dome-house-design-view

And the home is as efficient as it is unique. Rainwater is collected from the copper clad roof by hidden gutters and is stored in rainwater tanks. The house also utilizes a solar hot water system, a drip garden watering system and double glazing to minimize energy usage.

copper-dome-house-bathroom-design

copper-dome-house-bathroom-design

The architects have also taken special care to make sure all of these green features are concealed so that they don’t take away from the house’s visual appeal.

copper-dome-house-1st-floor-plan

copper-dome-house-1st-floor-plan

source: inhabitat, mcbridecharlesryan

Fascinating Eco Design from Ironbank at Auckland

ironbank-windows-facades

ironbank-windows-facades

The Ironbank is located in a unique historic area in between of Auckland’s central business district and a quarter undergoing urban renewal. The project was recently awarded a 5 Star Green Star rating from the New Zealand Green Building Council for its forward thinking green systems, which include rainwater collection, solar hot water heating, natural ventilation via a night purging system, low embodied energy materials, and the recycling of nearly 95% of the construction materials.

ironbank-front-door-view

ironbank-front-door-view

Completed in 2009, the Ironbank is a mixed use office and retail building in Auckland that has received a number of accolades for its rusty “container” architecture, environmentally sustainable design, and its impressive parking garage featuring an innovative robotic car stacking system.

ironbank-containers-blocks-design

ironbank-containers-blocks-design

Designed by Aukland based RTA Studio, the Ironbank is not only ecologically and sustainably designed, but it was recently awarded 5-Star Green Star rating awarded by the New Zealand Green Building Council.


Ironbank’s front facade offers retail space and has been built to respect the height of the Victorian and Edwardian buildings that surround it. The rear of the building is a seven story office tower composed of a rusty facade and container like blocks stacked at skewed angles.

ironbank-building-view

ironbank-building-view

While the front respects the historic nature of the street, the back contrasts with a very industrial, utilitarian and functional aesthetic and program.

ironbank-automatic-car-stacking-system

ironbank-automatic-car-stacking-system

source: inhabitat, ironbank, rtastudio, worldarchitecturenews

Fascinating Energy Neutral House in Amsterdam

energy-neutral-house-wooden-decoration

energy-neutral-house-wooden-decoration

The Energy Neutral House 2.0 by Netherlands-based FARO Architecten is a single-family residence in Ijburg, near Amsterdam, that comes complete with its own tree inside. Uses combination of passivhaus design with super-tight insulation, triple paned windows, and heat exchangers, the house uses very little energy, which is supplied via a roof mounted small-scale wind turbine and a photovoltaic system.

energy-neutral-house-ventilation-panel

energy-neutral-house-ventilation-panel

This townhome achieved Passivehaus energy efficiency standards with an insulation value of rc=10, liquid tight joints, and HR ventilation. Air is pre-heated or pre cooled with a ground source heat exchanger installed two meters underground, and additional space heating and water heating is provided via solar hot water collectors that are installed in the cornices of the building on the roof. Rainwater is collected from the roof then stored in a cistern in the garden and used for toilets and laundry.

energy-neutral-house-livingroom-interior

energy-neutral-house-livingroom-interior

Inside, the home makes beautiful use of simple wood paneling and large wooden beams and trees are used for both structure and decoration. The wooden facade was treated in an interesting way in order to eliminate the need for paint or other treatments.

According to an old Japanese technique, the wood is charred so that the top layer is preserved and will never need to be treated. If more heat is needed inside the home a wood pellet stove with a heat pump supplies the extra warmth.

energy-neutral-house-front-view

energy-neutral-house-front-view

Ventilation flaps on the roof can be opened during the summer to let heat escape, and windows are set back from the facade to prevent too much heat gain.

energy-neutral-house-diningroom-interior

energy-neutral-house-diningroom-interior

Energy for the home is provided via a DonQi wind turbine and 6 sq meter of photovoltaic panels on the roof.

energy-neutral-house-blueprints

energy-neutral-house-blueprints

source : inhabitat, faro-architecten, dailytonic

EcoPark as Malibu’s Eco Education Center

EcoPark-Workroom-Interior-Design

EcoPark-Workroom-Interior-Design

Busch and a slew of other green minded professionals started ecoTech Design Studio, a green product and architectural design/building firm, in order to start their dream project. ecoPark will consist of an eco-education discussion center and activity room, a solar heated pool, an energy generating gym, sustainable landscaping and trails, and demonstration eco homes. The entire 20 acre complex will be powered with renewable energy, use water efficiently, and grow produce organically.

EcoPark-with-Pond-and-Fountain

EcoPark-with-Pond-and-Fountain

Located in Malibu, they a lready built on the site are Busch’s home, design studio and pool, along with some of the infrastructure needed for the development. The design team received permission to begin construction at the end of August. Beyond the structures to be built, the ecoPark will feature a number of sustainable technologies in order to educate visitors to the park.

EcoPark-with-Green-Garden

EcoPark-with-Green-Garden

When visitors arrive at the park, they will park in a lower lot and be transported via electric vehicles that are charged on site with renewable energy and also generate energy when they travel on speed bumps around the park.

Wind art sculptures around the property generate power to provide landscape lighting. A Koi and turtle rescue pond will serve as wildlife restoration and bio fertilizer, saltwater ponds will grow algae for biofuel and organic gardens will grow produce. The gym will generate energy from the exercise machines and the nearby pool is heated with solar power.

EcoPark-Livingroom-Interior-Design

EcoPark-Livingroom-Interior-Design

The buildings will be constructed according to Passive House standards and feature living walls, green roofs, native landscaping, solar power, solar hot water and rainwater collection systems. Solar ovens will be used to demonstrate alternative cooking near the pool and organic waste will be composted on site.

EcoPark-Kitchen-Set-Interior

EcoPark-Kitchen-Set-Interior

A demonstration prefab house called the safeHAUS will also be constructed on site from reused shipping containers. Besides learning about the green buildings and technologies, visitors can also hike on the trails around the park.

EcoPark-Bedroom-Interior-Design

EcoPark-Bedroom-Interior-Design

source : inhabitat, superlarge, ecotechdesignstudio, buschdesign

Christie Walk : New Eco Urban Village in Australia

Christie-Walk-With-Solar-Panel-Electricity

Christie-Walk-With-Solar-Panel-Electricity

The Christie Walk development in downtown Adelaide was built as an experiment in how sustainable and dense design could still offer a peaceful and quality lifestyle for its residents. The result is 27 very efficient and healthy households that require much less water and energy than their neighbors.

Christie-Walk-With-Solar-Hot-Water

Christie-Walk-With-Solar-Hot-Water

The complex uses a thorough plan that maximizes health and efficiency, making the most of solar energy and providing a lot of outdoor living space on a small amount of land. The development shows how enriching sustainable building can be for a community, making it a pedestrian and plant friendly village.

Christie-Walk-Roof-Garden

Christie-Walk-Roof-Garden

It’s design by the Architect group Ecopolis as the seed for a much larger eco housing development. The medium density project stands up to five stories tall and has an extensive roof garden and pathways.

The super efficient walls are made of a porous fly ash concrete to regulate temperatures. Four cottages are built from straw bales and natural and reclaimed materials are detailed throughout the project adding an eclectic and organic feel that speaks to the ecological underpinnings.

Christie-Walk-Kitchen-Set

Christie-Walk-Kitchen-Set

The building’s east-west orientation helps maintain a passively cooled and heated interior and energy consumption is complimented by solar hot water batch heaters and solar electric arrays throughout. Natural ventilation is enhanced by the vegetation draping the sunny North side.

Christie-Walk-Four-Stories-Apartment

Christie-Walk-Four-Stories-Apartment

Roof top gardens and a lower vegetable garden are feed by collected rainwater which also supplies the toilets. The efficiency and renewables help the residences keep their energy consumption near half of average city dwellers.

Christie-Walk-Diningroom-Interior-Design

Christie-Walk-Diningroom-Interior-Design

source : inhabitat, urbanecology, globalis, ecopolis, sustainablecities

Unique Zero-Energy Housing Covered in Solar Panels

Zero-Energy-Housing-system-design

Zero-Energy-Housing-system-design

A new design for an eco housing development structure has been made in the coast of Aalborg, Denmark. The design structure have a striking sustainable design shape with sloped roof that completely covered by solar panels in their surface.

Zero-Energy-Housing-public-space

Zero-Energy-Housing-public-space

This design purposed to make a building that use renewable energy as the power. In order to do that, the solar panel roof will be added by four small wind turbine to produce more energy by use the ocean breeze to covered a lot of energy that needed by the building itself.

Zero-Energy-Housing-ground-structure

Zero-Energy-Housing-ground-structure

This magnificent house designed by C.F.Møller in collaboration with Moe & Brødsgaard, Cenergia, Phillips, Schüco, Erik Juul and Vogt landscape.  The roof is covered by 1,200 sq m photovoltaic system, which is enough to produce 1740 kWh of electricity for each unit with total of 104,400 kWh.

[Read more...]

Modern Net Zero House Within Costa Rica Rain Forest

Net-Zero-House-With-Infinity-Pool

Net-Zero-House-With-Infinity-Pool

SPG Architects has built the modern house that placed within the wilds of the Costa Rican rain forest on the Osa Peninsula. It’s surprisingly light on the environment and is able to run completely off grid since there are solar system on the roof and a micro-hydropower system located nearby.

Net-Zero-House-Surrounding-by-Forest

Net-Zero-House-Surrounding-by-Forest

The owner’s criteria for the home required that above all the home must be environmentally sensitive, technologically advanced and modernist by design. From the looks of it, it appears that the owners got what they wanted.

Net-Zero-House-Solar-Panels-System

Net-Zero-House-Solar-Panels-System

They transformed the house from an abandoned construction site into an elegant steel-framed concrete slab structure, which they used to create the masterpiece that is Casa Torcida. That was a lots of works for SPG Architects. Total it has 18,000 sq ft width include indoor and outdoor space.

[Read more...]